Saturday, September 20, 2014

Study Examines UV Nail Salon Lamps, Risk of Skin Cancer

Pictured are (L to R): Dr. Frederick Rueggeberg, Professor of Oral Rehabilitation and Oral Biology at GRU’s College of Dental Medicine, Dr. Lyndsay R. Shipp, a fourth-year Dermatology Resident at Georgia Regents University and Health System, and Dr. Loretta Davis, Chief of Dermatology at GRU’s Medical College of Georgia.

Pictured are (L to R): Dr. Frederick Rueggeberg, Professor of Oral Rehabilitation and Oral Biology at GRU’s College of Dental Medicine, Dr. Lyndsay R. Shipp, a fourth-year Dermatology Resident at Georgia Regents University and Health System, and Dr. Loretta Davis, Chief of Dermatology at GRU’s Medical College of Georgia.

Using higher-wattage ultra violet (UV) lamps at nail salons to dry and cure polish was associated with more UV-A radiation being emitted, but the brief exposure after a manicure would require multiple visits for potential DNA damage and the risk for cancer remains small, according to Georgia Regents University researchers.

Dr. Lyndsay R. Shipp, a fourth-year Dermatology Resident at the Medical College of Georgia and Georgia Regents Health System, says the use of lamps that emit UV radiation in nail salons has raised some concern about the risk of cancer, but previous studies have lacked a sampling of lights from salons.

In research published in the April edition of JAMA Dermatology, Shipp and her co-authors, Dr. Loretta Davis, Chief of Dermatology at MCG and Dr. Frederick Rueggeberg, Professor of Oral Rehabilitation and Oral Biology at GRU’s College of Dental Medicine, tested 17 light units from 16 salons with a wide range of bulbs, wattage and irradiance emitted by each device.

And while, higher-wattage light sources were correlated with higher UV-A irradiance emitted, “Our data suggest that, even with numerous exposures, the risk for skin cancer, remains small,” Shipp said. “That said, we concur with previous authors in recommending use of physical blocking sunscreens or UV-A protective gloves to limit the risk of skin cancer and photo aging.”

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